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August 2021

Tuesday, 31 August 2021 00:00

Complications of Overly Sweaty Feet

We all deal with foot sweat from time to time, but if you find that your feet are wet, clammy, or leaving soggy footprints on the floor, you may have plantar hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition that causes excessive sweating. It can affect various parts of the body, but is particularly common in feet. Other than being annoying and possibly embarrassing, untreated plantar hyperhidrosis can have health consequences. Excessive sweating can make the feet perpetually moist, increasing the risk of fungal (athlete’s foot, toenail fungus), bacterial (folliculitis), and viral (warts caused by HPV) infections and skin breakdown. A heat rash, which causes itching, redness, and stinging, may also develop. If you are suffering from plantar hyperhidrosis, a podiatrist can help find the most effective treatment for you.

If you are suffering from hyperhidrosis contact Dr. Lee R. Stein of Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Hyperhidrosis of the Feet

Hyperhidrosis is a rare disorder that can cause people to have excessive sweating of their feet. This can usually occur all on its own without rigorous activity involved. People who suffer from hyperhidrosis may also experience sweaty palms.

Although it is said that sweating is a healthy process meant to cool down the body temperature and to maintain a proper internal temperature, hyperhidrosis may prove to be a huge hindrance on a person’s everyday life.

Plantar hyperhidrosis is considered to be the main form of hyperhidrosis. Secondary hyperhidrosis can refer to sweating that occurs in areas other than the feet or hands and armpits. Often this may be a sign of it being related to another medical condition such as menopause, hyperthyroidism and even Parkinson’s disease.

In order to alleviate this condition, it is important to see your doctor so that they may prescribe the necessary medications so that you can begin to live a normal life again. If this is left untreated, it is said that it will persist throughout an individual’s life.

A last resort approach would be surgery, but it is best to speak with your doctor to find out what may be the best treatment for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Your feet are made up of 26 bones. While any of these bones can be fractured, there are three foot bones in which stress fractures are particularly common. The metatarsal bones account for between 17% and 35% of all foot stress fractures. These bones are located near the front part of your foot and connect the toes to the midfoot. Metatarsal fractures are especially common among runners and dancers. The calcaneus or heel bone is the site of 21% to 28% of stress fractures. The navicular bone, which is located on the top of the foot, is also a common site of stress fractures. Stress fractures can worsen without treatment, causing pain, tenderness, swelling, bruising, and weakness that interferes with daily activities. If you suspect that you have broken a bone in your foot, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein from Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 17 August 2021 00:00

How Did I Sprain My Ankle?

Sprained ankles are one of the most common injuries among athletes. Sprains occur when the ligaments that connect to the bones become inflamed or torn. Ankle sprains are usually noticeable right away, and they are often a result of the foot turning inwards under the body’s weight. Pain can also be felt throughout the ankle, and the joint will likely swell and become bruised. Common treatment methods for sprained ankles include ice, rest, an ankle brace, and ankle taping. However, it can be difficult to tell the difference between an ankle sprain and a fractured or broken ankle. Because of this, patients who believe that they have sprained their ankle should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and advised treatment plan.    

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein from Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 11 August 2021 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Tuesday, 10 August 2021 00:00

What Causes Ingrown Toenails?

When a toenail curves at the sides and grows down into the surrounding skin, an ingrown toenail can form. This causes the toenail to dig deep into the skin resulting in pain, redness, and swelling in the affected area. Common methods that are used to prevent ingrown toenails can include wearing shoes and socks that allow enough room for the toes to move freely, keeping the feet clean and dry, and cutting the toenails straight across but not too short. Ingrown toenails may develop due to trauma, a fungal infection, psoriasis, or pressure that is applied on the nailbed from certain athletic activities. Other risk factors can include diabetes, circulation problems, or numbness in the toes. If you have an ingrown toenail that is persistent or looks infected, visiting a podiatrist can be extremely beneficial for your foot health.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein of Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Poor circulation refers to reduced, inadequate blood flow to a part of the body. The feet, ankles, and lower limbs as a whole are often affected by poor circulation. Symptoms of this condition include cold, numb feet, hair loss on the lower limbs, skin discoloration, dry or cracked skin, brittle toenails, and slow or poorly healing wounds on the feet. That last symptom can be particularly dangerous, as wounds can become infected and lead to a variety of complications. This is especially true for people who have diabetes and diabetic neuropathy, which can cause nerve damage and a loss of sensation that makes wounds more difficult to detect until they have progressed. If you are experiencing the symptoms of poor circulation in your feet and ankles, regularly seeing a podiatrist can help you manage your condition.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Lee R. Stein of Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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