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December 2021

Tuesday, 28 December 2021 00:00

What Are Causes of Stress Fractures?

Most people have heard of shin splints, which affect the lower leg bone as the result of hard pounding while running. But this same activity can also affect the metatarsals of the foot, resulting in stress fractures. Metatarsals are the five long bones in the foot that connect the heel and arch to the toes. The second and third metatarsals are those most likely to develop stress fractures, which are tiny cracks in the bones. This makes sense because this is the area of the foot that takes the brunt of pounding during activity. Stress fractures are thought to be more common in women and older people. Participating in certain activities – including running, playing basketball, dancing, and marching – also increases the likelihood of developing stress fractures. In addition, osteoporosis, arthritis, diabetes, and calcium deficiency can be contributing factors. It may be hard to tell if you have stress fractures, because often the pain subsides after you stop the activity. However, if you begin to feel the pain even when you are not exercising, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist, who can properly diagnose your condition and suggest an appropriate treatment plan.

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein from Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
Tuesday, 21 December 2021 00:00

When to See the Podiatrist for a Broken Toe

If you have injured your toe and notice that it is red, bruised, swollen, painful, or difficult to walk on, you may have broken your toe. A mild toe fracture may respond to conservative treatments, such as resting and icing the foot, taking pain medication, wearing comfortable shoes or orthotics, and taping the broken toe to the healthy toe next to it. A more severe fracture, however, will require more serious medical intervention. If you have injured your toe and have pain or swelling that lingers after two or three days, have difficulty walking up to six weeks after the initial injury, or if you have diabetes, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. If you have an open fracture, with the broken bone poking through your skin, please seek medical attention immediately to prevent permanent damage and infections. For more information, please consult with a podiatrist.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein from Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Tuesday, 14 December 2021 00:00

How Often Should Orthotics Be Replaced?

Orthotics are inserts placed in your shoes to add cushioning that are often prescribed for people who have plantar fasciitis or other painful foot conditions. They can improve your gait and posture as well as help reduce pain. Orthotics can be made specifically to fit your foot, which increases their efficacy, and are either soft, semi-rigid, or rigid depending on the foot condition being treated. They last different durations based on materials, your weight, and the amount of activity you do. Replacement of orthotics can range from three-to-six months to several years. To help orthotics last longer wipe them with a damp – not wet – cloth, or use spray shoe cleaners. Wearing shoes that fit properly will also add to the lifespan of your orthotics. If you notice that your orthotics are fraying, smell bad, or are worn, they may be doing you more harm than good and probably need to be replaced. Please visit a podiatrist before deciding on which orthotics, inserts, or insoles are best for your feet. And check back with your podiatrist periodically to see if they need to be replaced.

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein from Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Foot Orthotics for Athletes
Thursday, 09 December 2021 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 07 December 2021 00:00

Being Overweight Can Cause Foot Problems

The more you weigh, the more stress is placed on the joints and tendons that support your feet and ankles. This can further extend to your knees and back as you compensate for the pain in the lower joints. Obesity can place enough strain on your feet to cause plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of the ligament that connects the heel bone to the front of the foot. Plantar fasciitis affects about 1 in 10 adults and is most likely to develop between the ages of 30 and 50. If you are experiencing persistent heel or foot pain, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for information about the possible causes and advice for proper treatment.

The more you weigh, the harder your feet must work to support your body. If you’re an obese individual and are concerned about your feet, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein from Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Obesity and Your Feet

People who are overweight are putting more pressure on their ankles, knees, and hips as well as their feet. This unfortunately can lead to variety of different issues.

Problems & Complications Stemming from Obesity

  • When the body is overweight, it tries to compensate by changing the way that it moves. An obese person may lean forward and put extra weight on the wrong part of the foot. This puts unnecessary stress on the feet.
  • Obese people are also more likely to develop type II diabetes which is a condition that causes a lot of foot problems. People with diabetes often don’t feel the cuts and sores that they may have on their feet, which can lead to more complicated and severe issues.
  • Plantar fasciitis is another foot condition that can be caused by obesity. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, which causes pain and stiffness while walking and climbing stairs.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Obesity and the Feet
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